August 4, 2021

Wind Port Update presented by The NJ Economic Development Authority

Meeting Notes as presented by Brian Sabina, Chief Economic Growth Officer, NJEDA

Offshore Wind

Currently New Jersey and New York States own the most offshore wind sites.  When considering locations for wind turbine marshalling (assembly) and manufacturing locations, Senate President Steve Sweeney championed the Lower Alloways Creek site as the perfect location for a number of reasons:

  1. Easy access to the bay and ocean without having to travel under bridges
  2. Close proximity of the Port of Salem and Salem/Delaware rivers to transport items to LAC by barge.  The parts for the turbines are huge and not easily transportable by truck.
  3. Access by rail to the Salem Port

The Wind Turbines and Mounts

Blades for the wind mills are longer than a football field.  The towers holding the engine (turbine) and blades are taller than the Statue of Liberty.  Pieces are assembled and transported vertically, so it’s important these huge structures do not have to go underneath one of the bridges to get to the open ocean.

The mono pile structures actually hold the turbines and blades and are sunk into the ocean floor, the windmills are then set onto these.  The mono piles will be assembled at the Paulsboro Port.  The “wind mills” aks turbines that include the tall piping, engine and blades will be assembled in LAC.  So the LAC Wind Port and Paulsboro projects are complimentary, not competitive.

Jobs

Between now and 2030, the Wind industry will create 83,000 new jobs in the Mid-Atlantic coastal region.

Immediate need at the LAC Wind Port will be 200 professional and technically skilled tradespeople (electricians, carpenters, welders, pipe fitters, heavy equipment operators, engineers, etc).  These initial workers will begin the site building phase.

The State of NJ through the NJEDA has committed to diversity and inclusion hiring that will include minority, veterans and women at no less than 18% to start.

200 jobs at the LAC facility is just the construction phase, NJEDA anticipates 1,000 positions will be created by the completion of the project when assembly and manufacturing of the turbines begins in 2024.

Additional jobs will be created in companies hired to assist and service the Wind Port.

Funding

NJEDA will fund the LAC Wind Port Project in two phases.

  • Phase 1 – Building – $400 million dollars
  • Phase 2 – $400 million dollars

Wind Port Project Timeline

Currently through September 2021 – Earth works for site stabilization & river dredging

  • 2024 – “Marshalling” begins – this is the actual assembly of the wind mills (turbines).
  • 2026 – Additional marshalling added & addition of manufacturing of the blades and engines

Wind Port Customers

  • Atlantic Shores Offshore Wind and Orstead (Wind Farm Companies) have both contracted to purchasing turbines manufactured and assembled at the LAC Wind Port.
  • General Electric has committed to building a Wind turbine (engine) manufacturing facility at the LAC Wind Port.

Local Business Suppliers

Additional businesses will be needed for the project  supply chain and The Chamber wants to ensure that our local businesses are included. NJEDA suggests all businesses interested in providing products/services register at:

NJEDA.com/offshorewind

Questions may be directed to